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FAQ - Iron Rich Foods - Low Iron - Foods to Enrich Iron - Raise Levels - Increase Child's Low Iron  Answer To Frequently Asked Child Medical Question

Iron Rich Foods

Optimal daily dietary iron intake:

Children - from birth to age 6 months: 10 mg dailyChildren - from age 6 months to 4 years: 15 mg dailyGirls - age 11 to 50: 18 mgBoys - age 10 to 18: 18 mg

Exactly What Foods Will Help the Most?
Eat more food containing Vitamin C. Vitamin C enhances the absorption of iron into your body. This is very helpful if you are a vegetarian. Vegetarians consume less iron because they obtain it from plant sources. Some plants contain chemicals that bind the iron rendering it more easily absorbed. You can also counteract this by eating foods high in calcium with it (calcium binds the chemicals, making iron absorbable). You can still obtain iron from vegetables. Foods such as beans, whole grains, spinach, and dried fruits have a significant amount of iron.

Red meat contains a significant amount of iron. If fat is a reason that you do not eat red meat, try eating extra lean meat. Liver is an excellent source of iron. (see table)

Eat a lot of iron rich cereal. Many cereals are fortified with iron. Check the food label on the box and look for iron under the daily values.

Some good sources of dietary iron are:

Grains: Iron (mg.)
Brown rice, 1 cup cooked 0.8
Whole wheat bread, 1 slice 0.9
Wheat germ, 2 tablespoons 1.1
English Muffin, 1 plain 1.4
Oatmeal, 1 cup cooked 1.6
Total cereal, 1 ounce 18.0
Cream of Wheat, 1 cup 10.0
Pita, whole wheat, 1 slice/piece, 6 ½ inch 1.9
Spaghetti, enriched, 1 cup, cooked 2.0
Raisin bran cereal, 1 cup 6.3
Legumes, Seeds, and Soy: Iron (mg.)
Sunflower seeds, 1 ounce 1.4
Soy milk, 1 cup 1.4
Kidney beans,½ cup canned 1.6
Chickpeas, ½ cup, canned 1.6
Tofu, firm, ½ cup 1.8
Soy burger, 1 average 1.8 to 3.9*
Legumes, Seeds, and Soy: Iron (mg.)
Sunflower seeds, 1 ounce 1.4
Soy milk, 1 cup 1.4
Kidney beans, ½ cup canned 1.6
Chickpeas, ½ cup, canned 1.6
Tofu, firm, ½ cup 1.8
Soy burger, 1 average 1.8 to 3.9*
Vegetables: Iron (mg.)
Broccoli, ½ cup, boiled 0.7
Green beans, ½ cup, boiled 0.8
Lima beans, baby, frozen, ½ cup, boiled 1.8
Peas, ½ cup frozen, boiled 1.3
Potato, fresh baked, skin on during cooking 4.0
Vegetables, green leafy, ½ cup 2.0
Other Foods: Iron (mg.)
Blackstrap Molasses, one tablespoon 3.0
Dates or Prunes, ½ cup 2.4
Beef, Pork, Lamb, three ounces 2.3 to 3.0
Liver (all kinds), three ounces 8.0 to 25.0

*can vary widely with brand. Check the label.



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